Understanding the USP: What Makes Your Business Stand Out? [Branding Basics Series]

Understanding the USP: What Makes Your Business Stand Out? [Branding Basics Series]

When starting and running any business or organization, differentiating yourself from those similar to yours is essential for future growth, and frankly, even for short-term survival. For instance, if you are going to be one of 5 bakeries in a town of 25,000, you need to find a way to stand out—why should anyone prefer your bakery over others? That is the driving question. In the earliest stages of your business you need to establish your USP. Otherwise known as the unique selling proposition, it is a statement that every company develops to describe what they offer, how it takes care of customer needs, and how it distinguishes them from the competition. It’s a declaration of why you’re better than everyone else who essentially does the same thing.

As the business owner of our theoretical bakery, there are many ways you could decide to differentiate yourself before you open the door the first day. Maybe you’re the only 24 hour bakery in the community or the only one open on Mondays. As it relates to product, maybe you’re the only bakery that makes bagels or caters weddings. Whatever it is, you need to state this as your USP as this will guide all of your marketing efforts moving forward, or at least until you reach the point where you need to rethink your unique selling proposition and make appropriate changes as you’re responding to the marketplace.

To be a bit more specific, if your plan is to offer the best customer service ever, your USP might be “Made Fresh 24/7.” If you want to differentiate with more of an emotional tactic, your USP might be “Just Like Mom Baked.” The USP doesn’t have to be an exhaustive document on all the minutia that makes you different, its a summary statement honing in on the one thing that will drive people into your business even though its likely there are many factors that can differentiate one bakery from another.

The USP for my company is “Building Relationships so You can Build Your Business.” While my team is always focused on taking care of client needs, from logo designs to websites and marketing strategy, we want to build a relationship with our clients. After the website is built or the corporate training is complete, we hope to continue to support our clients through encouragement, networking and sending them opportunities as they present themselves. What we’re not building is a conveyor belt system such that when we’re finished with one task we quickly move on to the next one. We want to take care of our customers because we care about them as people, too. Whether local or glocal, we share the same community, and we can thrive together.

Once you have developed your USP, you might want to go back to some of your closest friends and colleagues and run it past them. People who know you, know your passion, and know your business, will be able to provide input that will help you to move forward. It’s always good to have a circle support to shine a light on your path and make the journey a bit easier.

It can be a huge step to finally decide “this is what I want to be known for” because there are other things you also want to be known for. It’s human nature to experience self-doubt and hesitate on a course of action. At some point, any course of action is better than none because there is so much to be learned in the process.

No one in business gets it right every time. And sometimes when they do get it right, its completely by accident. If you’d like some feedback on your unique selling proposition or you’re not sure where to start, let us know. We’d love to connect with you and help you get things started.

Skills Required to Be a Successful Entrepreneur

Skills Required to Be a Successful Entrepreneur

These are non-negotiables. If you struggle in any of these areas, your ability to build a business will be seriously challenged. Of course, some entrepreneurs and long-time business owners are better at some of these points and build a team to close in on the other areas that are necessary for a successful business. For instance, if you’re not good at training staff, you can hire that out if your budget allows. But some things can never be outsourced. If your’e unable to make friends or even deal with failure, you’ll only be in business for a short time. What areas do you need to work on?

 

  • Ability to manage money.
  • Ability to raise money.
  • Ability to relieve stress.
  • Ability to be productive.
  • Ability to communicate effectively.
  • Ability to make friends
  • Ability to identify strengths & weaknesses.
  • Ability to hire and train staff.
  • Ability to manage staff.
  • Ability to do digital marketing.
  • Ability to connect via social marketing.
  • Ability to focus on your customers.
  • Ability to close a sale.
  • Ability to spot new trends.
  • Ability to deal with failure.
  • Desire to improve your world.
5 Tips for Improving Your Nonprofit E-Newsletter

5 Tips for Improving Your Nonprofit E-Newsletter

There’s nothing more important to the success of a nonprofit organization than the quality of its communications. From your brochures, website, and public speaking events, your message has one shot at being received. Once you lose someone’s attention, whether because of poor presentation or inaccurate information, its difficult to get it back. The same is true for your digital email campaigns. Don’t underestimate the impact of a quality e-newsletter. Though your organization is considered a charity, people are often not that charitable if content is sloppy, poorly formatted…..or worse, out of date. The following 5 tips will help to improve your organization’s email campaigns and make it easier to reach your intended audience.

1. Design Emails to be Mobile Friendly (Responsive)

By the end of 2014, 66% of emails were opened on a mobile device like a smartphone or tablet and that number is only growing. Designing your emails to be mobile responsive helps them make the most impact when opened by your supporters. Emails that lack the responsive design are impossible to read, creating a lost opportunity. Don’t encourage your readers to hit the delete button, give them something they are able to read. Platforms like Mailchimp and Constant Contact offer free or affordable options for setting up your email the right way.

2. Quality Content

Email is an opportunity. Once an email is opened, you have a real chance to make an impact on a supporter. Be sure all information sent is up to date including upcoming events, schedules, donation figures, etc. Share stories about your volunteers, or if possible, features about the people your organization serves. Donors want to know that their money is going to work for the stated cause of an organization and email is one way—and an easy way—to deliver those details.

3. Send Email Campaigns with Regularity and Respect

Have an email campaign schedule that your supporters remember. Its recommended not to send on Mondays and Fridays, and when you send do it early enough in the day that they will be opened and read. If sent too late in the day, your readers may not get a chance to look as their day comes to a close. You should also avoid sending too frequently. As soon as someone believes their email box is being inundated with email blasts, they will unsubscribe.

4. Always Include a Clear Call to Action

One of the ways you can determine the success of an email blast is by looking at which links were clicked or actions were taken. For example, if you put out a call for new volunteers and include a link or email address for those who are interested to respond to, you can begin to see the effectiveness of your emails. Give your readers something to do in each email! This will become a helpful metric in determining your overall success.

5. Make it Easy to Opt In to Your Organization’s Email List

Make it easy for your supporters to opt-in to your email list via social media and your website. Have it on the contact page, footer and even on Facebook. Once they are on the list, encourage them to forward it to friends so that they can opt in too. Your supporters are your biggest advocates and can be a huge benefit to your cause.

Email campaigns can assist an organization in expanding its reach and effectively promoting its cause. Contact us to discuss how Sarah Flashing Creative & Consulting can help you be more successful in promoting your cause.

 

Your Visibility Impacts Your Brand: 6 Tips for Managing Your Reputation

Your Visibility Impacts Your Brand: 6 Tips for Managing Your Reputation

Marketing is a fun, creative activity that can also test your patience, especially the area of reputation management. Everything is marketing, not just your logo, your business card and advertising campaigns. Everything your audience sees you doing both personally and professionally represents your work. So your personal life can become a marketing asset or even a liability if you have any activity in social media and/or are visible in your community. Your brand identity is ultimately the experience your customers have with your product and any time they interact with you as a person. This can lead to your corporate identity being synonymous with your personal public image. To be clear, how people know you CAN impact your business, so it’s crucial to think before you speak, as the saying goes.

So you’re wondering the obvious question, where is the line between my public and private life? Clearly everyone in any business just wants to shed themselves of their work and do their own thing on their own time and not be seen, even if it’s just for a little while. Those days are over. The era of social media has essentially eliminated the privacy anyone ever really enjoyed. Unless you’re inactive on your social channel profiles, the world has access to your pet pictures, social vents and your personal beliefs and values. And because they won’t ever really go away, your words and images on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter have the potential to define your brand identity and overshadow your products and services. As soon as you start to share all things personal, the line between your public and private life has essentially been erased.

So the concerns you may have about how to maintain your positive standing as a business owner are best answered by how you choose to be visible. Here are 6 tips to managing your reputation online and off, and preserve a bit of that line that separates the personal image from the public.

  1. Avoid public discussion on deeply controversial topics. Many families still adhere to the maxim “don’t discuss politics and religion” at holiday gatherings. The point is clear. You can’t change who your family is but you can avoid conflict with the people who are always yours. Do the same with your customers and community. Your business is about selling a product or service you believe in. The second you walk into a dispute entirely unrelated to your work, it may mean a loss in revenue. If someone wants to buy a dozen cookies from your store, should it really matter who they voted for in the last election?  You may never restore a relationship with a customer or client if all they remember how angry you got in social media or the argument they witnessed in your store.
  2. Don’t share your boudoir photos. If you’re on social media and you like to post selfies, be sure that the context in which they are taken doesn’t morally compromise any projects or products you’re involved with. For instance, if your work entails counseling people with alcohol addiction, don’t post images of yourself drinking 6 martinis. If you are the president of a local nonprofit aimed at helping underprivileged children,  you should reconsider posting anything that has sexually explicit themes. People shouldn’t judge–but they do.
  3. Get out in front of a story. If there is some bad press coming your way about something you may or may not have had control over, be the first to address it. Don’t hide from it or give people time to make up their own mind about why you’re not addressing the issue. Take responsibility and practice transparency. Make all apologies that are necessary and take appropriate action to rectify the matter. It’s important to listen, respond and show your willingness to alter policies or procedures to inspire the confidence of your audience, especially those who are paying real close attention to the matter at hand. Marketing strategy often involves crisis communications. To stay in business, you need to be able to manage a crisis and not let it manage you.
  4. Privatize your emotions. If something or someone on social media or in the community upsets you, don’t fly off the handle. Give serious thought to your reactions and responses. Always keep the long game in mind, because people remember who the keyboard warriors are. If you must address an issue, make sure you’re addressing it with facts. Avoid attacking and insulting people, keep the focus on the issue. Remaining cool, calm and collected in your community is the recipe for a solid reputation.
  5. Be positive and supportive. If your local and social footprint is known for being an encouragement to others, you really don’t have anything to worry about. Be a team player in the community and in social media. Support the great work that others are doing. This is another great way to get your name and business out there, too. Show empathy when necessary and be a person known for charity and courteousness. People love to support businesses who are known for supporting a community and its causes.
  6. Keep your social posts to a minimum. Whether for personal or business purposes, if it seems that all you do is hang out on Facebook, this probably is not helpful. Push your business posts only as frequently as necessary. People who follow your business online don’t want to see their feed filled with just your content. Be strategically discreet on the social channels so that people remember who you are instead of wishing you’d go away.

Confidence or Insecurity: What Do You Communicate?

know-it-all-300x223You can always put on a facade of confidence, but most people are able to see through that. Overly-hyped confidence can come across as insecurity and be extremely overbearing on others. You may know and believe everything you discuss with others, but it is the insecure person who needs to tell everyone everything they know. True confidence sometimes means holding back, giving time for who you are to be revealed naturally instead of being forced on others. You can be known as a know-it-all (and we all know one), or be known as someone with who is wise and knowledgeable in her field, who is sought out on the basis of her reputation, not rejected because of it. (more…)

Implementing a Marketing Strategy Takes Work

social mediaResources like Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook are great tools for communicating your message. But these aren’t magical tools, it actually takes work to to get your message out there. People don’t just start following you because you set up an account on any of these platforms. Apart from hooks in your writing, you need to actually find people who are interested in what you have to say. Social media is no different from real life–outside of a relationship, no one really cares what you might have to say. Of course, once you become known by some as an expert in your field, others will find out about your work. Word of mouth is what we use to call it, but the concept is still the same. Successfully sell your ideas to a few and more will follow. But it takes work and doesn’t happen over night.