Skills Required to Be a Successful Entrepreneur

Skills Required to Be a Successful Entrepreneur

These are non-negotiables. If you struggle in any of these areas, your ability to build a business will be seriously challenged. Of course, some entrepreneurs and long-time business owners are better at some of these points and build a team to close in on the other areas that are necessary for a successful business. For instance, if you’re not good at training staff, you can hire that out if your budget allows. But some things can never be outsourced. If your’e unable to make friends or even deal with failure, you’ll only be in business for a short time. What areas do you need to work on?

 

  • Ability to manage money.
  • Ability to raise money.
  • Ability to relieve stress.
  • Ability to be productive.
  • Ability to communicate effectively.
  • Ability to make friends
  • Ability to identify strengths & weaknesses.
  • Ability to hire and train staff.
  • Ability to manage staff.
  • Ability to do digital marketing.
  • Ability to connect via social marketing.
  • Ability to focus on your customers.
  • Ability to close a sale.
  • Ability to spot new trends.
  • Ability to deal with failure.
  • Desire to improve your world.
5 Strategies for Growing Your Nonprofit Organization in 2020

5 Strategies for Growing Your Nonprofit Organization in 2020

Nonprofit organizations are businesses, not unlike where you buy your groceries, get your hair done, or buy your kids school supplies. But what makes your nonprofit corporation different from those is that you prioritize revenue in terms of fulfilling your mission whereas the for-profit business prioritizes revenue for the sake of the revenue itself.

How your nonprofit is EXACTLY like a business is that you need to utilize many of the same tools for successful start up and growth. You need a business plan, a marketing plan, a budget, and staff or volunteers….all for the purpose of executing and accomplishing your mission and goals. Because nonprofits are often providing for a cause or a service and not a tangible, out-the-door consumable, generating revenue can be a challenge. So I want to share a few ways to overcome challenges to growth at any stage in the life of the non-profit.

Donor Development. Because donors are the lifeblood of your organization, you need to be meeting with them as often as possible, thanking them for past support and updating them on your organization’s status. While you can’t have lunch with everyone who has written a check, you can be sure to connect with those who are top level donors. Share with them the stories about the people you serve who are at the heart of your organization’s mission and get them excited about their involvement in those successes. Let them know their dollars were well spent, thank them for their commitment and partnership and continually inform them about the great things that are happening. But no matter what, make sure you are thanking every single donor who supports your organization in some way, shape or form.

Marketing Strategy. Make sure your marketing materials are current and that you have a robust communications strategy that: 1) keeps your donors informed 2) provides opportunity for new donor acquisition 3) interfaces with the media and 4) continually communicates your mission and shares your stories. Email marketing still plays a significant role for nonprofit organizations as it provides a means to stay in front of your supporters without anything more than their consent to receive emails. Email marketing tools like Mailchimp, Constant Contact and AWeber are examples of affordable options for every size organization and provide templates for the less experienced email designer as well as professional services for getting the custom design you want.

Your website needs to be designed in a responsive format. This means that when its viewed on smaller devices like phones and tablets, it adjusts to its environment instead of becoming impossibly microscopic. The reason this is important is because so many more internet users are looking at websites on their mobile devices and not always their desktops. Don’t make the mistake of losing supporters and followers because your website is difficult to view on these smaller devices. Yes, this will mean a website redesign is in order, but it will be an investment worth making. Don’t cut corners on your internet presence, that’s often how the people in your community first come to know you.

Valued Volunteer Resources. Create a culture where your staff and volunteers can’t help but to share your mission with the people in their world. They love what your organization stands for, that’s why they are involved. Create incentives like volunteer appreciation events and monthly recognitions so that they get more than lip-service for their time – they need to actually feel appreciated and valued. When its clear that an organization values all of its resources and prioritizes its “human” resources, this can inspire others to get involved as well.

Leadership. The face of your organization, whether an Executive Director, board president, operations manager, or marketing/PR director, needs to be someone who reflects the values of the organization, is able to provide clear and concise information about its mission, goals and needs, and is capable of inspiring others to participate, support or just simply share about the organization to other people in other spheres of influence. This person is the ambassador for your cause, so if they struggle to lead the organization internally or externally, they may not be the right person for the position. Don’t underestimate the need for someone who can speak to a crowd of 20 or 200 who also has the disposition to connect with volunteers.

Co-Branding & Collaboration. Find ways to collaborate with other groups and organizations in your community. Doing so doesn’t mean sacrificing current or potential donor dollars to other nonprofits. You want to be seen as a member of an interactive community, not like you’re living on a nonprofit island and no other mission matters. An aspect of reputation management for any business or organization is a willingness to be altruistically involved in a community. If you are involved in an art museum, you could plan to collaborate with local children’s organizations to do workshops. If you represent a cat rescue you might find ways to work with local medical facilities to fulfill animal-assisted therapy needs. In the world of marketing, this is called “co-branding,” a strategic marketing partnership between two separate organizations who collaborate to generate interest from their respective customers. The success of one brand provides for the success of the partner brand.

Growing your nonprofit organization requires a great deal of attention to donor development, volunteer management & support, community engagement, strong leadership, and marketing. Every nonprofit who wants to fulfill their mission and achieve their goals needs to work hard in these 5 areas. I hope the ideas I’ve shared help you to continue to grow and move your organization forward to the next level.

Business Basics: 5 Ethical Practices to Implement into Your Business

Business Basics: 5 Ethical Practices to Implement into Your Business

Ethics play a major role in business today and can impact everything from brand reputation to employee relations and overall profitability. The relationship between the disciplines of marketing/communications and ethics is one that is often overlooked, but your best marketing professionals can help you in both arenas. (more…)

I Still Haven’t Found What I’m Looking For: Why Your Cleverness Will Undermine Your Marketing Strategy

I Still Haven’t Found What I’m Looking For: Why Your Cleverness Will Undermine Your Marketing Strategy

U2 stated the problem but never really offered us a solution. Your potential customers may be climbing the highest mountains and scaling city walls looking for you. But if in the spirit of creativity or so-called “trends” you’ve obscured your brand in such a way that you’ll never be found in searches on Google, Yahoo or Bing, you’ve created a problem that needs to be fixed.

While involved in a recent networking conversation, a question was posed about whether a personal coach should continue to use “coach” in her title or should she get with the times and adopt the language of “consultant.” The answer to the question is ultimately another question: what are potential customers searching for?

It’s true that titles and terms get overused or stigmatized. In the world of “coaching” there is concern it is being overrun with unskilled and untrained people lacking certifications and tarnishing the reputation of the industry. Here’s a newsflash for you coaches, this is true in every industry – but changing your name from “coach” to “consultant” may just create confusion.

If at some point all restaurant chefs wanted to change their title from “chef” to “meal constructor” and began promoting their services with this new title because a chef somewhere brought shame on the entire industry due to some rookie mistakes, potential employers would be very confused. They aren’t searching Indeed or LinkedIn for “meal constructors.” Restaurants look for chefs.

People who look for coaches are familiar with the word coach – don’t miss the opportunity to expand your business by obscuring yourself among your competition. But don’t take my word for it. Do the research and see what your most successful competition is up to. Where are they located? How much business are they known to be generating? Are they a coach or a consultant? Whatever you’re doing to promote your brand, unless you have unlimited financial resources, breaking new ground by repositioning the entire industry within a new framework because of a trend you heard about is not what’s going to lead you down a path of success. You need to market yourself so that when potential clients are visiting Google, Yahoo and Bing, they can find exactly what they are looking for and you are included in those search results.

My Story: Why I Chose to Be a Marketer

My Story: Why I Chose to Be a Marketer

I’ve always been in marketing. I haven’t always been a marketer. My career began while I was in the midst of raising a family, but my work in marketing began much earlier than that. Marketing is the practice of selling ideas and one aspect of what it truly means to be human and to live in community.

My professional career in marketing began to take shape as an academic writer during and after graduate school. I understood the importance of “selling” ideas on paper because I was just wired that way. For many years, even prior to entering the academic environment, I had been drawn to philosophical debate – the marketplace of ideas was definitely where I felt most at home.

While completing my masters program in ethics, I began to work the area of non-profit leadership and communications. Almost immediately, I was propelled into some stories of national relevance and quickly learned how to get my message to the media the way it needed to be delivered for the sake of a cause. During this time, the academic enterprise proved it was all about the selling of ideas in ways not dissimilar from any other marketing endeavor like selling books, shoes or cell phones. The products I sold were of the intellectual flavor, but products nonetheless.

I entered the world of marketing because while at work to persuade others about ideas that I was passionate about, I found myself drawn to understand and implement more formal marketing strategies. The educator in me wanted to help others understand it, too. Having a concise message formulated and deliverable to a target audience was my job for many years in roles that were not formally marketing roles, yet roles that necessitated I perform successful marketing functions. As soon as it became clear to me that marketing was fun and I was good at it, my focus shifted and I discovered my new passion – to help others clearly articulate their message and effectively share their stories to their audience.

As people who live in a world shared with others, effective communications is integral to the quality of life in our shared communities. As purveyors of ideas, our best days are those when we respect each other with messages and stories that are, at their root, concerned with the well-being of others. People are smart, not easily duped into believing the newest fad concept delivered by the latest and greatest marketing ploy. So we should be transparent about the products, ideas and services we’re trying to persuade others to buy because people remember when they have been taken. The most creative and successful marketing tactics will include the most honest stories we can tell.

I want the work I do to mean something to someone somewhere. Projects I work on will not have relevance to everyone. For the people my work is intended to reach, I want to make a difference. My role as a marketing professional is to help my clients develop and disseminate their message to their target audience in a way that’s compelling and reflective of the passion poured into their work each day. I am a marketer offering creative solutions to tell the story that most effectively promotes your product, service or cause.

Give them Something to Talk About: Influencer Marketing

Give them Something to Talk About: Influencer Marketing

Probably the best marketing device at your disposal is the ability to create an amazing experience for your customers. When they leave your business establishment, what they are motivated to speak about—positive or negative—has great power to influence. Word of mouth is a form of influencer marketing and is growing exponentially in the virtual world.  But the product promos by reality stars and sports figures on Instagram don’t carry the weight of the customer who just left your store with the memorable experience they will share with their friends and family—online and off.  Let’s give your customers something to talk about:

One chance to make a first impression. The old adage is true, and if you fail to make a positive, memorable connection you may never have the chance again to convert them from browser to buyer. The days of “how may I help you” need to be replaced with “welcome” and an attitude of “how can I make this a great experience”…and then actually creating an experience that they will want to repeat over and over again. They may have walked in to simply find something they need, but make sure they get what they want, too.

Value. It goes without saying, if your product or service isn’t worth what the customer paid for it, whether an issue of quality or price, they will share their product experience with others.  Customers want to feel as if they got a great deal for a great product, which is why businesses like Kohls are so successful with their discount programs. Kohls has figured out how to make the customer feel taken care of in an area of high priority—the wallet—and they know their customers talk about it to their friends and family. Those last few minutes in Kohls is what causes them to return again—when they receive their Kohl’s Cash and receipt showing how much they saved which makes them feel happy. Make your customers feel happy by creating a sense of value in your product or service.

Authentic & Respectful. People have come to accept all the buzz words and jargon when they enter a business establishment. But when a server effectively communicates that they care that you enjoy your drink, or the cycle shop talks through your uses of a new bike and doesn’t try to close the deal on the most expensive bike in the shop, you feel respected and taken care of. As a business owner, you’ve been in the shoes of your customer too, so don’t try to sell them a product or story that you wouldn’t buy yourself.

The experience people are looking for when shopping online is both the quality of the product and the convenience of shopping. In your local business, people are wanting more. Enjoy having the opportunity for the face-to-face exchange and make the most of their experience. They will tell others about it and so will you. Give people something to talk about that is beneficial to you and continue to find ways to create a memorable experience for your customers every time they visit.